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Concept 4: How Much Physical Activity is Enough?


Glossary

Concept 4: How Much Physical Activity Is Enough?



FIT Formula
  A formula used to describe the frequency, intensity, and length of time for physical activity to produce benefits. (When "FITT" is used, the second "T" refers to the type of physical activity you perform.)
 
Target Zone
  Amounts of physical activity that produce optimal benefits.
 
Health Benefit
  A result of physical activity that provides protection from hypokinetic disease or early death.
 
Moderate activity
  For the purposes of this book moderate activity refers to activity equal in intensity to a brisk walk. Level 1 activities from the activity pyramid are included in this category and are sometimes referred to as sustained physical activity.
 
Overload Principle
  A basic principle that specifies that you must perform physical activity in greater than normal amounts (overload) to get an improvement in physical fitness or health benefits.
 
Performance Benefit
  A result of physical activity that improves physical fitness and physical performance capabilities.
 
Physical Activity Pyramid
  This pyramid illustrates how different types of activities contribute to the development of health and physical fitness. Activities lower in the pyramid require more frequent participation whereas activities higher in the pyramid require less participation.
 
Principle of Diminishing Returns
  A corollary of the overload principle indicating that the more benefits you gain as a result of activity, the harder additional benefits are to achieve.
 
Principle of Progression
  A corollary of the overload principle that indicates the need to gradually increase overload to achieve optimal benefits.
 
Principle of Reversibility
  A corollary of the overload principle that indicates that disuse or inactivity results in loss of benefits achieved as a result of overload.
 
Principle of Specificity
  A corollary of the overload principle that indicates a need for a specific type of exercise to improve each fitness component or fitness of a specific part of the body.
 
Threshold of Training
  The minimum amount of physical activity that will produce benefits.
 
Vigorous Activity
  For the purposes of this book vigorous activity refers to activities that elevate the heart rate and are greater in intensity than brisk walking. It is also referred to as moderate to vigorous activity. Those activities from level 2 of the pyramid are included in this category.

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