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Coming Soon. A database of Primary Sources, organized chronologically, is also available. To learn more about the raw materials of history, link to over 300 historical documents and images, including pages of Martha Ballard's diary and photographs of women in the Civil Rights Movement. Your instructor may ask you to examine various documents and write your own interpretation of them. You can also use the documents on your own in conducting research for a paper or in preparing a presentation.





Photographs/Art
Charts/Graphs/Maps


Woloch
Women and the American Experience: A Concise History 2/e
                              
Woloch
Early American Women: A Documentary History, 1600-1900 2/e
 

Woloch
Women and the American Experience 3/e


Ware
Modern American Women: A documentary History 2/e

 

 


 

Primary Sources:

Seventeenth Century


Read 18 poems by Anne Bradstreet in their original form, part of the Poetry Archives at http://www.emule.com/poetry/?terms=anne+bradstreet&page=search_results.

"What say you, are you guilty of witchcraft, of which you are suspected, or not?" Read the verbatim transcripts of the 1692 Salem witch trials in three volumes at http://etext.virginia.edu/salem/witchcraft/texts/transcripts.html

See a real arrest warrant for witchcraft against Elizabeth Proctor and Sarah Cloyce.  Also, view trial examinations and evidence, a sample death warrant, and petitions of accused witches at http://www.law.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/salem/salem.htm.

Check out the progress of the Jamestown Rediscovery Project at http://www.apva.org/finding/index.html.  Over 350,000 artifacts have been found, at least half of which date back to the first years of the colony.  View pictures of the artifacts and maps illustrating the early colony.

Find laws written in 17th-century America regarding slavery, indentured servants, and religion at http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/vcdh/jamestown/laws.html.

Read state papers, including grants and commissions from Charles II to Virginia colonists, at http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/vcdh/jamestown/statepapers.html.

Read real copies of letters from John Rolfe, John Pory, Bartholomew Gosnold, and Richard Frethorne at http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/vcdh/jamestown/letter.html.

Find original images of Jamestown, including earthenware and an imprint of the arrival of the English at http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/vcdh/jamestown/gallery.html

See original maps of Jamestown used by 17th-century colonists at http://jefferson.village.virginia.edu/vcdh/jamestown/gallery.html.  

Look at the Mayflower documents of the 1620s.  Link on the table of contents to see the Mayflower Compact, the Peace Treaty with Massosoit, the Pierce Patent, and the Divisions of Land and Cattle.  They provide a window into the struggles and values of colonial life at http://www.mayflowerhistory.com.

     
 

 

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