Chapter by Chapter Summary of Changes to
John Santrock’s
Life-Span Development, 6th Edition

The following pages contain a chapter by chapter list of the changes found in the sixth edition of John Santrock's Life-Span Development.


Chapter 1 | Chapter 2 | Chapter 3 | Chapter 4 | Chapter 5 | Chapter 6 | Chapter 7 | Chapter 8 | Chapter 9 | Chapter 10 | Chapter 11 | Chapter 12 | Chapter 13 | Chapter 14 | Chapter 15 | Chapter 16 | Chapter 17 | Chapter 18 | Chapter 19 | Chapter 20 | Chapter 21 |

CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION

--Review and suggestions for changes by Glenn Elder, U. of North Carolina and current President of the Society for Research in Child Development

-- New section on conceptions of age

-- New section on thinking critically about life-span dev

--New and Expanded critical thinking features, removal of old ones. New Ones:

--Movement of Practical Knowledge about Life-Span Development pieces to the end of the chapter; A new book review is included: Fifty to Forever (1994)

--New end-of-chapter feature, Resources for Improving Human Development

--Expanded coverage of the life-span perspective, including differential changes in key processes across the life span (See also Figure l.6)

--Removal of parenting and education box from each chapter to reduce clutter in chapters--at appropriate places, some of this material is worked into the flow of chapters

--Updated Figure l.7 on increase in ethnic minority groups

--In every chapter, the concept tables have been rewritten and in a number of instances made more concise and clear

--New end-of-chapter feature--cognitive tree added as part of summary to give students a visual portrayal of chapter's main organization

-- Reference housecleaning: Deletion of more than 20 dated references and addition of a number of new, more recent references

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CHAPTER 2: THE SCIENCE OF LIFE-SPAN DEVELOPMENT

--Reviewed by Glenn Elder, whose life-course theory is receiving increased attention

--Important addition of new theory--Glenn Elder's Life-Course Theory to go along with Bronfenbrenner's theory as a second environmental, contextual theory

--New section on analogies that have been used to describe how development occurs, including new figure 2.7

--New methodological section on life-history records

--Addition of material to help students better understand interviews and questionnaires

--Shortened Sociocultural Worlds Box 2.l

--Deleted Parenting and Education box on imitation

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Two New and expanded critical thinking pieces, deletion of old ones. New ones:

Development

--Deletion of more than 20 dated references, addition of a number of new, more recent references

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CHAPTER 3: BIOLOGICAL BEGINNINGS

--Review and suggestions for changes by Hill Goldsmith, a leading behavior geneticist from the U. of Wisconsin and David Buss, the leading figure in evolutionary psychology from the U. of Michigan

--Important new section on the very recent approach called evolutionary psychology

--Complete revision of the discussion of sociobiology for more balanced presentation

--New discussion of the Bell Curve Controversy that focuses on heredity and intelligence

--New high interest discussion in Life-Span Health and Well Being about the genetic transmission of malignant hypothermia

--New Figure 3.4 on sickle-cell anemia

--Revised definitions of adoption study and nonshared environmental influences

--New book review of How Healthy Is Your Family Tree (1995)

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Two new high interest critical thinking inserts:

--Deletion of more than 25 dated references, addition of a number of new, more recent references

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CHAPTER 4: PRENATAL DEVELOPMENT AND BIRTH

--This chapter has been extensively revised. Review and suggestions for changes by Tiffany Field and Claire Kopp, two of the leading experts in the world on infant development

--Added comment about spontaneous abortions

--New study on an infant having AIDS virus and then it went away

--New AIDS baby poster

--New section on the increasingly popular technique called "doula" as a childbirth practice

--Revised commentary about when the Brazelton Scale is usually administered

--New, expanded critical thinking pieces:

--New, revised discussion of whether preterm infant will have developmental problems

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 40 dated references, addition of a number of new, more recent ones

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CHAPTER 5: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT IN INFANCY

--Review and suggestions for changes by Tiffany Field and Melanie Spence, experts on infant physical and perceptual development

--This chapter has been extensively revised

--Extensively revised and expanded section on the brain

--New section on the recent perspective, developmental biodynamics

--Revised and updated discussion of fine motor skills, especially development of reaching and grasping

--Discussion of new study on exposure to passive smoke and Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

--Extensively revised, updated discussion of toilet training

--Extensively revised, updated, and expanded material on infant perception

--New section on theories of infant perception, emphasizing the information processing and ecological theories

--New section on perceptual constancy

--New section on visual expectations

--Revised and expanded discussion of intermodal perception

--New and expanded critical thinking discussions:

--Revised life-span health and well-being endpiece to include discussion of the right stimulation

--New book recommendations in Practical Knowledge section: Infancy (1990) by Tiffany Field and Baby Steps (1994) by Claire Kopp

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Reference housecleaning--Deletion of more than 25 dated references, addition of new, more recent references

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CHAPTER 6: COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN INFANCY

--Review and suggested changes made by Nan Ratner, an expert on language development from the U. of Maryland, Mavis Donahue, also an expert on language development, from the U. of Illinois-Chicago

--New Images introduction on Piaget's observations of his own children

--Extensive revision and updating of language development

--New and expanded critical thinking pieces:

--New discussion of Patricia Kuhl's ideas about infants' recognition of speech sounds and Figure 6.5

--Revised, expanded discussion of biological basis of language

--Updated, expanded comments about LAD (language acquisition device)

--Revised, expanded, updated coverage of critical period concept

--New photo of Genie, Figure 6.7

--New discussion of why social interactionist aspects of language have been underplayed

--New Life-Span Health and Well-Being piece on how parents can facilitate their child's language development

--New Life-Span Practical Knowledge book, Growing Up with Language by Naomi Baron

--New Resources for Improving Human Development section

--Removal of 40 dated references with significant reference updating

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CHAPTER 7: SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN INFANCY

--Review and suggested changes by Lise Youngblade, U. of Michigan, and Margaret Owen, U. of Texas-Dallas, both experts on attachment and family processes

--New discussion of measuring attachment and Ainsworth's strange situation and new

Figure 7.3

--New section in the new functionalism in emotions

--New Figure 7.4 of infant in research study that reflects the new functionalism in motions

--New, expanded critical thinking discussions of:

--New research discussion of poverty and day care

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--New Section ending review: Life-Span Review of Infancy, which briefly reviews some of the major themes discussed in the three chapters on infancy

--Deleted more than 70 dated references and significantly updated research citations

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CHAPTER 8: PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD

--Review and recommended changes by Rosalind Charlesworth, expert on early childhood education

--New discussion of non-sexist early childhood education

--New, expanded discussions of critical thinking:

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 40 dated references and addition of a number of more contemporary citations

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CHAPTER 9: SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN MIDDLE AND LATE CHILDHOOD

--Reviews and suggested changes by Diana Baumrind, leading expert on parenting and family processes from the U. of California at Berkeley, and Greta Fein, expert on children's play from the U. of Maryland

--Revision of images opening piece on diversity of families to remove bias on poverty and parenting

--Revision of labels for parenting styles--change from permissive-indifferent and permissive indulgent to neglecting and indulgent

--New material on cultural aspects of sibling interaction

--New section on the roles of income and economic stress in divorce and its effect on children

--New photo asking students to identify which of Parten's categories are displayed by the children

--Expanded discussion of pretend play, including its imagination and communication of meaning dimensions

--New section on television and children's cognitive development

--Revised and updated discussion of teachers, schools, and gender development

--New, expanded discussions of critical thinking:

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 60 dated references and addition of many new recent citations

--New Section ending review, Life-Span Review that goes over some of the main themes of Early Childhood

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CHAPTER 10: PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN MIDDLE AND LATE CHILDHOOD

--Reviews and suggested changes by Sandra Graham, expert on children's achievement and ethnicity from UCLA, Robert Siegler, leading expert on children's information processing from Carnegie Mellon U., and William Katz, language expert from the U. of Texas at Dallas

--New section on comparison of approaches to learning, cognitive development, and intelligence

--New section on resiliency in childhood

-- Significantly revised section on children with a disability focusing on more recent terminology and concepts, such as inclusion

--New section on children's scientific reasoning

--Expanded discussion of children's poverty and stress

--Expanded discussion of role that content knowledge plays in children's memory

--Recent research on Terman's gifted children as adults, including evaluation of women in Teman's gifted study

--Revised description of main approaches to teaching reading

--Discussion of new research on bilingualism

--New discussion of negative aspects of performance orientation in achievement

--New, expanded discussions of critical thinking:

--New feature, Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 70 dated references and significant new updating of research citations

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CHAPTER 11: SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN MIDDLE AND LATE CHILDHOOD

--Reviews and suggested changes by two leading experts on gender, Florence Denmark from Pace U., and D. Bruce Carter from Syracuse U., and by Lawrence Walker, leading researcher on moral development from the U. of British Columbia

--New definitions of peer statuses, and addition of concept of controversial children

--Important revision and updating of discussion on gender differences and similarities

--New section on gender controversy

--New section on gender in context

--Revised and updated discussion of the school experiences of children from different ethnic groups

--New, expanded discussion of critical thinking:

--New section on family processes and moral development

--Updated discussion of school health programs in Life-Span Health and Well-Being endpiece

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 75 dated references and insertion of a number of new more recent citations

--New section ending review of major themes in Middle and Late Childhood--two pages

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CHAPTER 12: PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN ADOLESCENCE

--Review and changes recommended by James Bryne, an expert on cognitive development from the U. of Maryland, and Daniel Lapsley from Brandon U., an expert on adolescence and schools

--New section on violence and youth

--Recent updating of adolescent trends in alcohol and drug abuse

--New, expanded discussion of critical thinking:

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 90 dated references and addition of a number of more recent citations

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CHAPTER 13: SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN ADOLESCENCE

--Reviews and recommended changes by Susan Harter, a leading expert on the self and identity, from the U. of Denver, and by Geraldine Brookins, a leading expert on culture andethnicity, from the U. of Minnesota

--New section on religious development, including discussion of developmental changes in religion, religiosity and sexuality, and Fowler's life-span theory

--New section on youth organizations

--New, expanded discussion of critical thinking:

--Description of new study on early dating and sexuality

--New Life-Span Health and Well-Being endpiece: El Puente, a successful community center for Latino youth in New York City

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 30 dated references and addition of a number of more recent ones

--New section review of Adolescence

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CHAPTER 14: PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN EARLY ADULTHOOD

--Review and suggested changes by Seth Kalichman, a leading expert on sexuality, especially AIDS, and Jan Sinnott, a leading expert on cognitive changes in adulthood

--Completely revised and updated discussion of obesity and dieting based mainly on the ideas of Kelly Brownell and Judith Rodin

--Revised and updated discussion of sexual attitudes and behavior, including the national survey, Sex in America, 1994, and Figure 14.3

--New discussion of continuum of sexual orientation, including Figure 14.4

--Revised and updated discussion of homosexuality

--Revised and updated discussion of AIDS

--Completely new section on sexual harassment

--Discussion of new recommendations by a panel of experts on how much and what type of moderate exercise is needed for optimal health

--Discussion of recent study on college students' perception of what it means to be an adult

--Discussion of recent data from the national survey of 300,000 freshman by Astin & others

--Revised and updated discussion of addiction and recovery

--New discussion of Sinnott's ideas on cognitive changes in adulthood

--New, expanded discussion of critical thinking:

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 60 dated references and addition of a number of new, more recent references

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CHAPTER 15: SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN EARLY ADULTHOOD

--Review and suggested changes by Stanley Gaines, expert on social relations and group behavior from Pomona College

--New section on the cognitive dimension of close relationships

--New Table 15.l on passionate love

--New, expanded critical thinking discussions:

--Updated research discussion of male-female friendship relations

--Incorporation of mother's role and father's role into the text

--Updated census figures on percentage of people living alone in the United States

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 50 dated references and addition of a number of new citations

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CHAPTER 16: PHYSICAL AND COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN MIDDLE ADULTHOOD

--Review and suggested changes by Ken Sheldon, a leading expert on health and stress from the U. of Rochester

--Completely new section on illness and health, evaluating biological pathways, behavioral pathways, and interventions in breaking down the stress-illness connection

--Completely new section on religion and meaning in life, including discussions of

--Revised and updated discussion of sexuality in middle adulthood, including data from the Sex in American survey, 1994

--New, expanded discussions of critical thinking,

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 25 dated references and addition of a number of new, more recent citations

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CHAPTER 17: SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN MIDDLE ADULTHOOD

--Reviewed and suggested changes made by Ravenna Helson, one of the world's leading experts on middle age, from Mills College

--Extensively revised discussion of longitudinal studies of adult development

--New discussion of John Clausen's recent analysis of the adult lives of the members of the Berkeley Longitudinal Study

--New discussion of Costa and McCrae's ideas about the stability of the Big Five Factors in personality

--New, expanded discussions of critical thinking:

--New section on resources for improving human development

--Deleted more than 30 references and added a number of new, more recent references

--New end of section, Middle Adulthood, review, two pages

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CHAPTER 18: PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT IN LATE ADULTHOOD

--Review and suggested changes by Armeda Ferrini, expert on health in late adulthood from California State University at Chico

--Updating of emphasis on successful aging

--Updating of emphasis on distinctions between the oldest old and other subphases of late adulthood

--Fascinating new discussion of the brains of the nuns of Mankato

--New introduction and overview for discussion of the course of physical development in late adulthood

--New research by Stanley Rappaport, chief of the neurosciences lab at the National Institute of Aging on older brains literally rewiring themselves

--New research on program of weight lifting to prevent osteoporosis

--New discussion of Ellen Langer's ideas on the importance of older adults' choosing the way they think

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deletion of more than 35 dated references and addition of a number of new, more recent citations

--New, expanded critical thinking discussions:

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CHAPTER 19: COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT IN LATE ADULTHOOD

--Review and changes suggested by Frieda Blanchard-Fields, expert on cognitive processes in late adulthood, from Georgia Tech

--Completely rewritten and updated section on dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Includes the recent view that the best way to find the cause of Alzheimer's is conceptualize it as a complex puzzle rather than having a single, minute cause.

--New discussion of respite care for the Alzheimer's caregivers

--New section on religion in late adulthood

--New Table 19.l on Schaie's research that focused on the factors that reduce the risk of intellectual decline in older adults

--New, expanded discussion of critical thinking:

--Updated discussion of role of health in cognitive processes in late adulthood

--New discussion of National Longitudinal Survey of Older men and the role of cognitive factors in work in late adulthood

--New photographs of famous people with Alzheimer's disease

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--New Practical Knowledge book recommendation and review: Mindfulness by Ellen Langer

--Deletion of more than 50 dated references and addition of a number of new references

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CHAPTER 20: SOCIOEMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT IN LATE ADULTHOOD

--Review and suggested changes by Vern Bengtson, one of the world's leading figures in intergenerational relations and the social dimensions of aging from the U. of Southern California

--Discussion of recent research on stereotyping of the elderly

--New, recent census data included on the poverty levels of the elderly

--New portrayal of Erikson's view of how positive resolution of the eight stages of the human life span can culminate in wisdom and integrity in old age, including new Figure 20.3

--New discussion of Kecolt-Glaser's research on the immune system of individuals involved in long-term care responsibilities

--New, expanded discussion of critical thinking:

--New section on Resources for Improving Life-Span Development

--Deletion of more than 80 dated references and addition of a number of new references

--New section ending overview of Late Adulthood, two pages

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CHAPTER 21: DEATH AND DYING

--Review and suggested changes by Joseph Durlak, a leading expert on death and dying issues, from Loyola University

--New section on decisions regarding life, death, and health care that includes living wills and durable powers of attorney

--Recent Canadian study of health care workers' decisions about withdrawing life support

--New discussion of dying as natural and expected among the very elderly

--Very recent, extensive study (1995) of how the terminally ill are treated in America's hospitals

--Expanded, updated discussion of hospice programs

--New table on effective communication strategies with a dying person

--Completely revised and updated section on losing a life partner, replacing previous section on widows and widowers

--New, expanded discussion of critical thinking:

--New section on Resources for Improving Human Development

--Deleted more than 40 dated references and added a number of new, more recent references


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Copyright ©2001 The McGraw-Hill Companies.
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McGraw-Hill Higher Education is one of the many fine businesses of the The McGraw-Hill Companies.

feedback form | permissions | international | locate your campus rep | request a review copy

digital solutions | publish with us | customer service | mhhe home


Copyright ©2001 The McGraw-Hill Companies.
Any use is subject to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.
McGraw-Hill Higher Education is one of the many fine businesses of the The McGraw-Hill Companies.